Jay-Z and Beyonce Can’t Exclusively Trademark Blue Ivy

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Jay-Z and Beyonce Can’t Exclusively Trademark Blue Ivy
Blue Ivy belongs to us all! ::cue maniacal laughter::

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office ruled yesterday that Jay-Z and Beyoncé can’t trademark the name of their daughter, illustrious Blue Ivy. Now Blue Ivy is everyone’s daughter. As she was so destined to be.

See, when Blue Ivy was born in January, the superstar duo filed a bid to trademark her like you would a brand because, well, that was exactly their reasoning: to reserve it for a potential luxury label of baby-related goods like carriages, diaper handbags, baby cosmetics (not joking), and baby butlers for babies (joking).

However, they were served a minor roadblock in the form of potential marketing confusion (always thinking ahead), when they discovered there already was a Blue Ivy company in existence since 2009. Veronica Alexandra started a wedding and event planning business with the same name.

In a not surprising outcome, Jay, Bey, and Blue lost this battle to exclusively claim their stake on a primary color and a species of evergreen plant found all over the world. They’re free to use the name for other potential business endeavors, but Veronica can continue to use the “Blue Ivy” name for all event, wedding, and related marketing and advertising purposes.

More adorable than Blue Ivy herself is how her empire-owning parents think they can just literally buy words. What’s next? Gwyneth trying to trademark “apple”? Personally, I’m just relieved that Bey and Jay weren’t able to exclusive own the rights to “blue” because the anxiety of not knowing what to call the color of the shirt I’m wearing this morning is too much for me.

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